NEWS & ARTICLES

Is Your Retirement Community Pet-Friendly?

Pet Friendly Retirement Community Pets can bring so much joy and help relieve anxiety and stress.  In this article, we’ll review how to make sure your retirement community is well-aligned with the needs of you and your pet. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize that pets can be comforting companions, particularly as we grow older.   Walking a dog can provide great exercise, loving companionship, and help provide purpose. 

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Why Retirement Communities Extend Lives Over Living Alone

Retirement Community Living As humans, we are naturally social creatures.  As we grow older, the opportunities to socialize may be inhibited by health, mobility, and other factors.  Let’s explore how retirement communities enhance social environments and potentially extend life expectancy. Unlike the nursing home that your grandmother went to, today’s retirement communities have been reinvented to provide a wide range of activities, services, and amenities.   Still, many people have the impression that moving to a retirement community will require them to give up their independence and therefore, many people postpone or resist the decision.  However, not only are today’s communities driven to help you maintain independence, the services offered on-site typically allow you to regain your independence much quicker, after an illness or accident.  But, the social factors of living in a retirement community cannot be overlooked.  Here are a few reasons why: Socialization. Socialization is important at every stage of our life.  As babies and toddlers, socialization helps us to develop communication skills and learn from those around us.  In our later years, socialization is just as important and even helps to maintain these skills.  In addition, opportunities to socialize help reduce loneliness, establish friendships, relate and interact with

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When Should I Consider a Move to a Retirement Community?

Why should I consider a Continuing Care Community We all wonder when are we ready to consider a Continuing Care Retirement Community? Many of us have considered a move to a retirement community, but many people are not sure when we should make the transition. If you are able to maintain your independence while still living in your own home and do not feel that your home and its upkeep is overwhelming for you this is a great time to start the search. Yes, start thinking about the retirement lifestyle, and just how that will simplify your life. If you are requiring assistance for your activities of daily living, a move to a cooperative living environment will be the best option for you before it’s too late to enjoy all of the amenities and various activities that take place in an active community. For more information about our active Community and many related services, talk to us. Use this as a guide to make your move. Eliminate Retirement Stereotypes Some people think of retirement communities as the option to turn to when outside services coming into the home for become too much to manage. While retirement living communities often offer

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Your Brain Activity: How to Stay Mentally Sharp in Retirement

Stay Mentally Sharp in Retirement The role of mental health and longevity is well documented. Just as we need to exercise our bodies to protect cardiovascular and bone health, working out our brains is essential to preserving our mental, social, and emotional health. Mental Stimulation and Combating Alzheimer’s Alzheimer’s disease is very common today. It’s characterized by mild memory loss in the early stages and can progress to include a decreased ability to make decisions or participate in activities of daily living. Starting at age 65, your risk of developing Alzheimer’s doubles every five years. To minimize your risk, experts in the field suggest that following a healthy diet rich in fruit and vegetables and exercising your brain with activities can be beneficial. BayWoods of Annapolis residents enjoy a well rounded daily schedule of activities offering both mental and physical stimulation. contact us for more information. Staving Off Dementia Dementia is an umbrella term for all forms of cognitive impairment. Dementia is most commonly associated with memory loss, but it can also manifest as a loss of language skills, motor activity, or ability to plan and make decisions. Vascular dementia, for example, can be the result of a stroke. There’s

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How to Care for Parents & Children At the Same Time

If you are part of the ‘sandwich generation’ you may be providing care for multiple generations including parents, children, grandchildren.  You are also still likely working and managing your own day-to-day household.  This can be a stressful and challenging lifestyle, so here are 4 tips for balancing your life while living in the sandwich generation. Get Help. No matter how many hours are in the day, you should try to arrange for help with some of the more routine tasks – like cleaning, shopping, and cooking.  Whether you hire the help or accept help from friends, neighbors or your local church, take some of these tasks off your to-do list so that you can focus on the higher priority items.  If you’re taking care of grandchildren, you may need to arrange for a playdate or sitter now and then.  Care.com is a great resource for finding short-term resources. Get Organized. When you’re being pulled in a lot of directions, it’s more important than ever to get organized.  A professional organizer can be a tremendous help for creating ways to make things more convenient and making sure everything has a place.  This will help you keep track of things, and plan

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Physical Activity May Be the Fountain of Youth

Senior Citizen Exercises With as little as 30 minutes per day, you can stay fit and feel younger too!  A variety of low-impact physical activity can be incorporated into anyone’s daily routine.  In this article, Baywoods of Annapolis takes a look at some of the most common and innovative ways seniors can stay fit! According to the National Institute on Aging, “exercise and physical activity… can help prevent diabetes, heart disease, and other chronic conditions affecting older adults.”  Below we’ve listed the four main types of exercise and physical activity that are recommended for seniors.  Many of these can be done from the comfort of your own living room!   As always, check with your physician before starting any exercise program.  Ok, here we go! Endurance exercise is aimed at increasing your endurance through low impact activities that make you breathe faster, speed up your heart rate, and burn off calories. These kinds of activities may include brisk walking or jogging, dancing, tennis, and more! Strength training is vital to preserving muscle mass, controlling weight, reduces the risk of osteoporosis, and decreases injury risk. You can begin strength training right at home with light weights, resistance bands, or by using your

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